.

Abies balsamea ‘Hudsonia’

 

Abies balsamea ‘Hudsonia’
Authors: Mill.
Dense and rounded with a flattened top, probably exceeding 1m tall in time, but growing at only 2-3cm per annum. Old specimens are much wider than high. Leaves 6-12mm long, deep green above, blue-white lined beneath. Known since 1829.
Several similar clones are cultivated and their names are sometimes interchanged. When young, all are difficult to tell apart. A.b. ‘Nana’ (syn. ‘Globosa’) has the branches pointing up at about 45° (in ‘Hudsonia’ they are 60°) and the leaves are said to have a yellowish margin. A.b. ‘Prostrata’ differs from ‘Hudsonia’ only in age when it becomes more widespreading and much less compact.
.

Family: Pinaceae
Approximately 39 species of evergreen coniferous trees from the northern cool temperate zone and mountains farther south. They are pyramidal to columnar in habit with a central mast-like stem and very much shorter, thinner branches arranged in whorls. The linear to needle-like leaves are leathery to rigid, borne in dense spirals, each one attached by a disc-like base. The strobili (flower spikes) are either all male or all female, the former catkin-like, the latter miniature soft replicas of the cones into which they develop after fertilisation. The erect cones are cylindrical to ovoid, composed of woody scales and seeds. When fully ripe they break up, releasing the winged seeds.
Uses:
With one exception all the true species are far too large for the rock garden. Even the one exception, A. koreana, is only suited to the largest rock garden. However, several species have given rise to dwarf or pygmy mutant cultivars which can be used effectively as specimen plants on the rock garden and pot plants in the alpine house. They require moderately fertile, ideally humus-rich, neutral to acid moist but well drained soil and full light, though some shade is tolerated. Propagation by cuttings in a cold frame in early autumn. Rooting is uncertain and slow and at least a full year will elapse before the cuttings are ready to pot up. A. koreanais easily raised from seeds sown in a cold frame or outside in spring.

 

.
Information courtesy of the Alpine Garden Society a member of

BUTTON 1

Please visit to find Growers, Enterprises, Events and Places to Eat.

We would appreciate your help to improve this site by sending us better information and pictures (credit and links will be given)